TITLE

New rights for terror detainees as deeply split Supreme Court rules

AUTHOR(S)
Gallagher, Bill
PUB. DATE
June 2008
SOURCE
Niagara Falls Reporter;6/17/2008, Vol. 9 Issue 23, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court to allow suspected terrorists to challenge their detention at the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The judgment, which took a split decision of 5-4, reaffirms the right to habeas corpus enshrined in the country. Furthermore, the judgment underline the relentless assaults on civil liberties of detainees at the country's naval base.
ACCESSION #
36265708

 

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