TITLE

Training local researchers in poor countries is the best way to improve health worldwide

AUTHOR(S)
Richards, Tessa
PUB. DATE
November 2008
SOURCE
BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);11/22/2008, Vol. 337 Issue 7680, p1195
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that health policy experts have determined that training young researchers in low income countries is the best way for wealthy countries to invest in global health. The experts met in Washington, D.C. to discuss the role of science in the advancement of global health diplomacy. Professor Jim Kim from the Harvard School of Public Health suggested that the global health community focus on developing the science of implementation and delivery of health care.
ACCESSION #
35611603

 

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