TITLE

Thirsty for power

PUB. DATE
October 2008
SOURCE
Utility Week;10/3/2008, Vol. 29 Issue 20, p32
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the benefits of the use of renewable energy generation to the water sector in Great Britain, both in terms of cash and carbon. As large energy users, water companies have a lot to gain from the clever harnessing of renewable energy. Benefits include price certainty over the future cost of energy supplies, security of supply, possible compliance with Carbon Reduction Commitment and delivery on corporate social responsibility expectations.
ACCESSION #
35010378

 

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