TITLE

Got Fat Kids? Blame the Schools!

AUTHOR(S)
Schuster, Karolyn; Buzalka, Mike
PUB. DATE
August 2000
SOURCE
Food Management;Aug2000, Vol. 35 Issue 8, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents the results of a research on school lunches to examine allegations about school lunches as the culprit behind the growing of obese children in the United States. Claim of school foodservice directors on the reduced level of fat in the lunches; Improvement of the food items like hamburgers and pizza; Emphasis on the addition of fruits and vegetables in the food selection.
ACCESSION #
3467864

 

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