TITLE

Germany

PUB. DATE
October 1916
SOURCE
America;10/7/1916, Vol. 15 Issue 26, p606
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the speech of the German Chancellor declaring the sole object of the struggle to the right to life and liberty in the country. It quotes a statement from the chancellor stating that the purpose of the Entente Allies is territorial covetousness and the destruction of Germany. Moreover, it says that the chancellor expressed his hope for the country to win the war.
ACCESSION #
34604474

 

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