TITLE

Translator's subjectivity in light of philosophical hermeneutics on translating LI Qing-zhao's lyrical poetry

AUTHOR(S)
Zhou Ling
PUB. DATE
February 2008
SOURCE
US-China Foreign Language;Feb2008, Vol. 6 Issue 2, p35
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The subjective role of the translator as an active component in the process of translation has long been neglected in the traditional translation studies. This paper applies the basic notions of Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics— historical interpretation and fusion of horizons— to justify, with a special view to the various versions of LI Qing-zhao's lyric poetry, the act of misreading, mistranslating and cultural filtering. It argues that all these clearly indicate the importance of the translator's subjectivity in the process of literal translation.
ACCESSION #
32203259

 

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