TITLE

Pollution changing the weather

PUB. DATE
April 2008
SOURCE
Ecos;Apr2008, Issue 142, p32
SOURCE TYPE
Blog Entry
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the study by researchers Wenju Cai and Tim Cowan at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation in Australia which suggests that atmospheric pollution is changing the Southern Hemisphere's oceanic circulation, which is causing weather systems across the country and in other mid-latitude regions to migrate southward. They explain that airborne pollution particles such as aerosols, cool the Northern Hemisphere's ocean surface. Cai asserts that they witness that human-generated aerosols are partly responsible for intensifying features such as larger ocean gyres.
ACCESSION #
32023027

 

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