TITLE

CARBON SCIENCES CONVERTS CO2 INTO USEFUL PRODUCT

PUB. DATE
May 2008
SOURCE
Industrial Environment;May2008, Vol. 19 Issue 5, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that the carbon dioxide emissions of U.S. power plants have increased by 2.9 percent in 2007. The findings of a study conducted by the Environmental Integrity Project of the Environmental Protection Agency also revealed that the carbon dioxide emissions of the electric power industry have increased 5.9 percent since 2002 and 11.7 percent since 1997.
ACCESSION #
31784392

 

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