TITLE

Atmospheric chemistry: Are plant emissions green?

AUTHOR(S)
Guenther, Alex
PUB. DATE
April 2008
SOURCE
Nature;4/10/2008, Vol. 452 Issue 7188, p701
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the issue regarding the effects of hydrocarbon emissions from living vegetation to the atmosphere. Terrestrial vegetation yields quantities of hydrocarbons and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which dominate global gas emissions. The greatest component of emissions from vegetation is known as the isoprene. These emissions, as suggested by current models, can overwhelm the ability of atmospheric oxidants to get rid of greenhouse gases like methane and toxic gases like carbon monoxide.
ACCESSION #
31593994

 

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