TITLE

Relationships between flowering phenology and female reproductive success in the Japanese tree species Magnolia stellata

AUTHOR(S)
Setsuko, Suzuki; Tamaki, Ichiro; Ishida, Kiyoshi; Tomaru, Nobuhiro
PUB. DATE
March 2008
SOURCE
Botany;Mar2008, Vol. 86 Issue 3, p248
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
We have examined the earliness, duration, and amplitude of flowering genets in a Magnolia stellata (Sieb. et Zucc.) Maxim. population in relation to their size, environmental factors (temperature and light), and female reproductive success (ovule survival rate) over three consecutive years. Average flowering durations of individual flowers, genets, and the whole population in these 3 years were 10.2, 15.2, and 29.0 d, respectively. A bisexual phase (with both female and male phase flowers) in genets spanned 62.9% of the total flowering period, suggesting that geitonogamy can occur. The earliness, duration, and amplitude of flowering genets were all significantly correlated, indicating that genets flower early and long periods have high flowering amplitudes. The three parameters were also significantly correlated with the size of the genets (represented by the diameter at breast height of its thickest ramet) and relative photosynthetic photon flux density at the top of their crowns. Therefore, genets that are large and located in well-lit sites tend to have many flowers, and blossom both earlier and longer. Later-flowering genets have higher female reproductive success, probably because M. stellata is protogynous. Significantly positive correlation between flowering amplitude and female reproductive success suggests that large numbers of flowers increase the attractiveness of genets for pollinators, and this outweighs the negative effects of geitonogamy.
ACCESSION #
31568376

 

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