TITLE

THE IRON TURTLE

AUTHOR(S)
Barnhart Jr., Donald I.
PUB. DATE
June 2000
SOURCE
Civil War Times Illustrated;Jun2000, Vol. 39 Issue 3, p46
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Chronicles the role of the Confederacy's first operational warship, the C.S.S. Manassas, during the American Civil War. Features of the warship; Development of the ship; Encounter with the Union's ship `Richmond'; Major General Mansfield Lovell's command of the Confederate ground and naval forces at New Orleans; Collision with the Federal steamer `Mississippi.'
ACCESSION #
3117549

 

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