TITLE

Top Resolutions for 2008: the Dollar and Taxes

AUTHOR(S)
Malpass, David
PUB. DATE
January 2008
SOURCE
Forbes Asia;1/28/2008, Vol. 4 Issue 2, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article explains that strengthening the dollar would be the easiest starting point for a 2008 no-lame duck turnaround in U.S. growth. Currency markets have bet heavily on dollar weakness. The market's assumption is that the Bush Administration likes the weak dollar. The weak dollar is causing inflation, high oil prices and a faster buildup of wealth abroad than in the U.S. Reversing this trend would draw capital back to the U.S., relieving the funding shortages in mortgage markets, speeding a housing recovery and slowing inflation.
ACCESSION #
28864704

 

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