TITLE

Bush Does Baghdad

PUB. DATE
March 2005
SOURCE
Kurdish Life;Spring2005, Issue 54, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents an analysis of the US attack to Baghdad. An excerpt of US President George W. Bush's State of the Union address in February 2005 is presented. It is suggested that the election in Iraq can be considered as a turning point in Iraqi history. Events involving the Iraq election and the events that happened several months thereafter is also discussed. An overview of the Iraqi conflict in the acquisition of political power between the elected officials and the insurgents are also presented.
ACCESSION #
28560008

 

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