TITLE

Darwin's Impact on Paleontology

AUTHOR(S)
Valentine, James W.
PUB. DATE
June 1982
SOURCE
BioScience;Jun1982, Vol. 32 Issue 6, p513
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Darwin converted most paleontologists to evnlutiun but not to natural selection; the patterns of fossil groups were not what Darwin supposed. Therefore a number of mostly vitalistic explanations were preferred or embraced and belatedly discarded as the evolutionary synthesis developed. Today, fossil patterns again inspire controversial non-Darwinian scenarios, the fate of which remain unsettled. (Accepted for publication 5 March 1982)
ACCESSION #
28051553

 

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