TITLE

TAKING TEAMS TO TASK: A NORMATIVE MODEL FOR DESIGNING OR RECALIBRATING WORK TEAMS

AUTHOR(S)
MATTSON, MARIFRAN; MUMFORD, TROY V.; SINTAY, G. SCOTT
PUB. DATE
August 1999
SOURCE
Academy of Management Proceedings & Membership Directory;1999, pI1
SOURCE TYPE
Conference Proceeding
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This paper presents a model for understanding the relationship between task characteristics, types of interdependence, and the effectiveness of several team structures. Researchers have long called for more thorough consideration of the actual work that groups are expected to accomplish when organizations implement teams. This paper answers that call by presenting a normative model of team effectiveness that integrates a typology of teams, tasks, and interdependence. Four general contributions are made. First, a typology of team types is specified using five dimensions drawn from research on teams. Second, tasks typologies are reviewed, and the task is then conceptualized in terms of McGrath's (1984) task circumplex and five types of interdependence. Third, a normative model is presented outlining the most effective team structure for each combination of task and interdependence. This model is summarized in eight propositions specifying the tasks for which each type of team is most appropriate. Practical and theoretical application of the model is discussed.
ACCESSION #
27622458

 

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