TITLE

LAST REFUGE

AUTHOR(S)
Cosier, Susan
PUB. DATE
September 2006
SOURCE
Audubon;Sep/Oct2006, Vol. 108 Issue 5, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the collaboration of the Audubon California and the San Bernardino Valley Audubon Society to pay a farmer to delay his harvest on 13 acres so that tricolored blackbirds could fledge. Report says that the bird colonies usually choose a nesting site in the San Jacinto Wildlife Area, but increasing development around the state preserve has fragmented their habitat, making it harder to build nests and find insects to eat. Effort to convert much of the agricultural land in southern California to residential land has also impacted the blackbirds.
ACCESSION #
26075263

 

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