TITLE

U.S. Taxpayers Are Financing North Korea's Nuclear Nightmare

AUTHOR(S)
Cox, Christopher
PUB. DATE
November 1999
SOURCE
Human Events;11/26/99, Vol. 55 Issue 44, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the policy reversal undertaken by the United States (US) government in providing foreign aid to North Korea. US President Bill Clinton's intention to normalize relations with North Korea; Overview of the escalating North Korean threat; Information on the efforts of the Clinton administration in dealing with North Korea's nuclear weapons development.
ACCESSION #
2537794

 

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