TITLE

Old-fashioned respect mandated

AUTHOR(S)
Lovely, Gail
PUB. DATE
October 1999
SOURCE
Curriculum Administrator;Oct99, Vol. 35 Issue 10, p11
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on a law pushed by Louisiana Governor Mike Foster requiring the state's K-5 public school students to address teachers by ma'am and sir. Comparison with the governor's `Respect' bill; Punishment for rudeness.
ACCESSION #
2536196

 

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