TITLE

It's not where you start, it's where you finish

AUTHOR(S)
Asher, Allan
PUB. DATE
January 2007
SOURCE
Consumer Policy Review;Jan/Feb2007, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p19
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Increasing rises in energy prices in the UK is bringing an increased focus on whether the presumed gains that liberalisation of the energy market would bring to consumers are real, and whether the market is working effectively for consumers. In this paper energywatch argue that ending self-sufficiency in gas supply is not an acceptable explanation for why UK consumers are not benefiting from competition, and outline reasons they believe are preventing the market from working as it should.
ACCESSION #
24627312

 

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