TITLE

Lenkų repatriacija į Lenkiją: 1944-1947 metai

AUTHOR(S)
Stravinskienė, Vitalija
PUB. DATE
March 2006
SOURCE
History: A Collection of Lithuanian Universities' Research Paper;2006, Issue 63, p34
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The author of the article analyses the repatriation of Poles from the then LSSR to Poland in 1944-1947; she also discusses the dynamics and results of this process, its organizers and their roles as well as the attitudes of the USSR and Polish representatives towards repatriation. This repatriation was conducted on the basis of the agreement signed on the 22nd of September 1944, by LSSR and Poland; however, both sides interpreted the agreement differently and had different views about its implementation. The Polish representatives required the repatriation of all Poles and Jews who hold Polish citizenship till September 17th, 1939, as well as that of pro-Polish Tatars and Karaite. They estimated that about 500 thousand people might return to Poland while the Lithuanian government considered the repatriation of only 250 thousand Poles and Jews who had the Polish citizenship till the beginning of the Second World War. Though officially only 171,158 people repatriated to Poland in 1944-1947, real numbers were higher - about 180,000-190,000. Repatriation reached its peak in 1946; about fifty percent of those registered for repatriation left the then LSSR, and the majority were from Vilnius. The consequences of this repatriation could be estimated by several aspects. First of all, it negatively affected Lithuania's ethno-demographic position, as this process created possibilities for the USSR citizens to settle in Lithuania. Thus the expectations of the Soviet Lithuanian government to settle more Lithuanians in Vilnius and its regions failed. Secondly, this repatriation qualitatively and quantitatively influenced the Polish community in Lithuania: the number of Poles decreased, the structure of their social-economic community drastically changed (many representatives of intelligentsia, rich burgers and farmers left for Poland), the process of assimilation and Russification accelerated. In addition, family and cultural-social relations were broken. Those who repatriated to Poland faced adaptation and financial problems.
ACCESSION #
24092627

 

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