TITLE

Renewable Energy -- the UK's Environmental Evolution

AUTHOR(S)
Spink, John
PUB. DATE
January 2007
SOURCE
Sustain' Magazine;2007, Vol. 8 Issue 1, p53
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the identification and implementation of renewable-energy resources in Great Britain. By the middle of the century, around 35 percent of Great Britain's energy should come from non-fossil fuels. However, there are concerns as to how land use will evolve to cater for the renewable revolution. The adoption of wind and energy crops can also reduce energy requirement. Although biomass crops have the potential to deliver environmental benefits, widespread planting in some areas could result in negative impacts on the landscape.
ACCESSION #
23811708

 

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