TITLE

Adoptive Parents, Adaptive Parents: Evaluating the Importance of Biological Ties for Parental Investment

AUTHOR(S)
Hamilton, Laura; Cheng, Simon; Powell, Brian
PUB. DATE
February 2007
SOURCE
American Sociological Review;Feb2007, Vol. 72 Issue 1, p95
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Contemporary legal and scholarly debates emphasize the importance of biological parents for children's well-being. Scholarship in this vein often relies on stepparent families even though adoptive families provide an ideal opportunity to explore the role of biology in family life. In this study, we compare two-adoptive-parent families with other families on one key characteristic—parental investment. Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten-First Grade Waves (ECLS-K), basic group comparisons reveal an adoptive advantage over all family types. This advantage is due in part to the socioeconomic differences between adoptive and other families. Once we control for these factors, two-adoptive-parent families invest at similar levels as two-biological-parent families but still at significantly higher levels in most resources than other types of families. These findings are inconsistent with the expectations of sociological family structure explanations, which highlight barriers to parental investment in nontraditional families, and evolutionary science's kin selection theory, which maintains that parents are genetically predisposed to invest in biological children. Instead, these patterns suggest that adoptive parents enrich their children's lives to compensate for the lack of biological ties and the extra challenges of adoption.
ACCESSION #
23783555

 

Related Articles

  • Adoption. Duarte, Uma // Skipping Stones;Jan-Mar2015, Vol. 27 Issue 1, p7 

    The article presents information on misconceptions surrounding adoption. It is noted that due to a reputation of having abandoned or given away their children, birth parents are usually viewed negatively while adoptees can have attachment issues as they have been left once before. The part...

  • THE STRANGER YOU KNOW. SMALE, AARON // North & South;Mar2014, Issue 336, p48 

    The article presents the author's views on adoption process in New Zealand. He opines on overseas adoptions in the country. He comments on a Law Commission paper on the 1955 Adoption Act, which points that the needs of the birth parents to express grief for their loss are not acknowledged by the...

  • A Critical Analysis of IQ Studies of Adopted Children. Richardson, Ken; Norgate, Sarah H. // Human Development (0018716X);Nov2006, Vol. 49 Issue 6, p319 

    The pattern of parent-child correlations in adoption studies has long been interpreted to suggest substantial additive genetic variance underlying variance in IQ. The studies have frequently been criticized on methodological grounds, but those criticisms have not reflected recent perspectives in...

  • Section 11 Adoption Act 1976: prohibition of private adoption placements, High Court agreeing to adoption order in spite of breach of prohibition. Cullen, Deborah // Adoption & Fostering;Winter2005, Vol. 29 Issue 4, p71 

    The article focuses on the ruling of the High Court on the prohibition of private adoption placements. A child was placed for adoption with adoptive parents, who were friends of her birth parents. Both set of parents were from the Muslim community and unaware of the provisions of the Adoption...

  • Intercountry adoption: Who are the good guys? Pollack, Daniel // Policy & Practice (19426828);Mar2005, Vol. 63 Issue 1, p28 

    Presents insights about intercountry adoption. Estimated number of foreign children adopted in the United States in 2003; Role of adoption statutes and international conventions in balancing the interest of children, birth parents, adoptive parents, states, cultures and countries; Increase in...

  • The Early Growth and Development Study: Using the Prospective Adoption Design to Examine Genotype–Environment Interplay. Leve, Leslie D.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reiss, David // Behavior Genetics;May2010, Vol. 40 Issue 3, p306 

    The Early Growth and Development Study (EGDS) is a prospective adoption design consisting of 360 linked sets of birth parents, adoptive parents, and adopted children followed from 3 months postpartum through child age 7 years and an additional 200 linked sets for whom recruitment is underway....

  • Post-Adoption Contact and Openness in Adoptive Parents' Minds: Consequences for Children's Development. Neil, Elsbeth // British Journal of Social Work;Jan2009, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p5 

    This paper explores openness in adoption on two levels: what contact children were having with their birth family (structural openness) and the openness of adoptive parents when it comes to thinking and talking about adoption (communicative openness). Children placed for adoption under the age...

  • Seek and You May Find. Tyre, Peg // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);8/15/2005 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 146 Issue 7, p54B 

    Focuses on "searchers," investigators who track down overseas birth families of adopted children. Work of Anna Sternad, a searcher, helping 250 adoptive families find information on birth families in order to assist the children figure out who they are some day; Number of children that United...

  • Seek and You May Find. Tyre, Peg // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);8/15/2005 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 146 Issue 7, p56 

    Focuses on "searchers," investigators who track down overseas birth families of adopted children. Work of Anna Sternad, a searcher, helping 250 adoptive families find information on birth families in order to assist the children figure out who they are some day; Number of children that United...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics