TITLE

What We Know About Embryonic Stem Cells

AUTHOR(S)
Condic, Maureen L.
PUB. DATE
January 2007
SOURCE
First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion & Public Life;Jan2007, Issue 169, p25
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses embryonic stem cells and their potential to be used as a therapeutic treatment for debilitating diseases. To address the problem of stem cell rejection by the immune system, researchers have focused on somatic-cell nuclear transfer, or cloning. The author believes that there is still much to learn about embryonic stem cells and that problems with their therapeutic potentiality exist, including rejection of the cells by the immune system and tumor formation.
ACCESSION #
23473113

 

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