TITLE

Dossier update: ivory ban upheld, for now

PUB. DATE
December 2006
SOURCE
Geographical (Geographical Magazine Ltd.);Dec2006, Vol. 78 Issue 12, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the decision of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) standing committee to uphold the ivory ban for the time being and crackdown on illegal ivory sales in unregulated markets. The decision has frozen the export and sale of stockpiled ivory from Botswana, Namibia and South Africa. These sales were agreed in principle by CITES in 2002 on the condition that Monitoring of Illegal Killing of Elephants systems were enabled in those countries in order to gather data on poaching and population levels. According to Will Travers of the Born Free Foundation, the crucial decision of the CITES standing committee meeting will help protect elephants throughout Africa and Asia.
ACCESSION #
23403240

 

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