TITLE

Battle-Tracking Tips for Junior Leaders

AUTHOR(S)
Waddell, Jackquline N.
PUB. DATE
July 2006
SOURCE
Engineer;Jul-Sep2006, Vol. 36 Issue 3, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents suggestions for junior army captains or non-commissioned officers on battle tracking. The purpose of battle tracking is to maintain regular flow of information from all directions. For successful battle tracking, officers are required to analyze the locations where they can deploy their soldiers according to the skills and abilities they possess.
ACCESSION #
22923831

 

Related Articles

  • Get Your Soldiers Ready For Deployment. Brown, Lori L. // Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin;Jul-Sep2003, Vol. 29 Issue 3, p47 

    Focuses on the deployment of soldiers for support in military operations of the U.S. Army. Role of the noncommissioned officer support channel in preparing soldiers for deployment; Details on military promotions; Information on team building efforts.

  • CONTINUAL ASSESSMENT AND REVISION OF SOPs. Carvelli, Michael P. // Engineer;Jan-Apr2009, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p63 

    The article focuses on the continual assessment and revision of standard operating procedures (SOP) in deployment. As part of the continual assessment process, input from soldiers should be included. A patrol leader cannot relies on the information to improve all the areas included in the SOP....

  • PREPARATION AND READINESS OF THE ARMED FORCES FOR NATIONAL CRISIS MANAGEMENT DEPLOYMENT. Frianová, Viera // Buletin Stiintific;Jun2012, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p29 

    This paper deals with preparation and readiness of the Slovak Armed Forces for non-combatant operations as well as fulfilment of assistance and relief tasks in Slovakia. The importance of this issue initiated the research project called "The Potential and Limits of the Slovak Armed Forces...

  • The Army of Tomorrow. Curtis, Vincent J. // Esprit de Corps;Jun2011, Vol. 18 Issue 5, p22 

    In this article, the author discusses the significance of Gates Doctrine to future military and defence operations. He considers the operations of the U.S. and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as the first working example of the doctrine. He notes the relevance of the doctrine to the...

  • Special Ops Signal Bn provides special support for Operation Iraqi Freedom. Flood, Patrick // Army Communicator;Fall2003, Vol. 28 Issue 3, p19 

    The article focuses on the U.S. Army's Special Operations Signal Battalion. It cites the role of the organization in providing support for Army and Joint Special Operations Forces including Army Special Forces, the 75th Ranger Regiment, and the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment. It...

  • Expeditionary Operations. Berg, PauL D. // Air & Space Power Journal;Summer2008, Vol. 22 Issue 2, p29 

    The article offers information on expeditionary operations, in which practically all Airmen are assigned to one of ten air and space expeditionary forces, and Air Force leaders constantly reiterate the importance of being ready to deploy. Expeditionary space and cyber operations involve less...

  • A Visual Tool for Mitigating Vulnerabilities. Sherwood, Seth L. // Army Logistician;Jan/Feb2007, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p18 

    The article informs about identifying and mitigating vulnerabilities during field training. A unique process for mitigating risks during reset after a deployment was developed. The first step was to identify clearly the vulnerabilities associated with a particular phase or operation. Then the...

  • Enduring Commitment. Kroesen, Frederick J. // Army Magazine;Nov2009, Vol. 59 Issue 11, p14 

    The article presents the author's insights on the commitment of American soldiers to the international suppression of terrorism. The author takes note on the increasing deployment rate of soldiers as of 2004 wherein 30, 000 soldiers were temporarily added. The author also mentions few examples...

  • Who's Watching for Russian Planes? Keighley, Larry // Saturday Evening Post;1/13/1951, Vol. 223 Issue 29, p30 

    Provides information on the radar-relay warning center which served as a detachment for U.S. Air Force soldiers on the Moonshine Able mountain in Japan. Purpose of the radio-relay station; Mission of the Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron to give warnings on enemy aircraft; Hazards of the...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics