TITLE

Taking the Census: Everyone Counts

PUB. DATE
January 2006
SOURCE
World Almanac for Kids;2006, p199
SOURCE TYPE
Almanac
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the United States Census and why it is necessary for a country to keep track of its population. The United States surveys its citizens every 10 years to learn basic information about them. Although the last census, taken in 2000, was thought to be one of the most accurate, it still missed about 1 in every 100 people. Censuses are important not only for information, but for states to determine how many political representatives and electoral votes it will have.
ACCESSION #
22692147

 

Related Articles

  • COUNTING AMERICA. Smith, Patricia; Roberts, Sam; Baker, Peter // New York Times Upfront;3/1/2010, Vol. 142 Issue 10, p14 

    The article focuses on the importance of the 2010 census which is touted as the largest peacetime mobilization in the history of the U.S. About 1.4 million people will conduct the census, working on a budget of 15 billion U.S. dollars. Aside from a national head count, the census will also...

  • Who counts? The politics of censustaking. Anderson, Margo; Fienberg, Stephen E. // Society;Mar/Apr97, Vol. 34 Issue 3, p19 

    This article describes the role, functions and politics of censustaking in the U.S. The federal constitution, Article 1, Section 2, mandates a decennial census for the purpose of reapportioning the House of Representatives and Electoral College for population change. Since 1790 therefore, an...

  • Stagnant Population Could Cost W.Va. a Seat in Congress. ROSS, JIM // State Journal (WV);1/16/2015, Vol. 31 Issue 3, p3 

    No abstract available.

  • 2010 Census: Counting Americans Overseas as Part of the Census Would Not Be Feasible: GAO-04-1077T.  // GAO Reports;9/14/2004, p1 

    The U.S. Census Bureau (Bureau) has typically excluded from the census private citizens residing abroad, but included overseas members of the military, federal civilian employees, and their dependents (in the 1990 and 2000 Censuses, these individuals were included in the numbers used for...

  • Census and Citizenship.  // National Review;9/29/1989, Vol. 41 Issue 18, p14 

    This article focuses on the plans of the U.S. House of Representatives to count illegal aliens in the census for purposes of congressional apportionment. It was reported that recently, the U.S. Senate voted to make the U.S. Census Bureau to adjust its procedures so that apportionment figures...

  • "Census Day" on 1990 Calendars.  // Futurist;Jan/Feb88, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p43 

    Reports that the U.S. Census Bureau has asked the nation's calendar makers to print "U.S. Census Day" on the April 1 boxes of all 1990 calendars. History of the U.S. Census; Comments from John G. Keane, director of the Census Bureau regarding the Census and how marking calendars will help with...

  • Reading an Electoral Map.  // Junior Scholastic;10/27/2003, Vol. 106 Issue 6, p18 

    This article presents electoral map and asks questions based on the map. Every ten years, the U.S. conducts a census in part to determine the number of seats each state should be given in the U.S. House of Representatives. The results also determine the number of Electoral College votes for each...

  • House Democrats secure victory on census question. Kaplan, Jonathan E. // Hill;6/13/2007, Vol. 14 Issue 70, p4 

    The article focuses that the the House Democrats persuaded the U.S. Census Department not to scrap a question on foster children in the American Community Survey (ACS). Census Bureau Director Charles Kincannon has responded to Representatives Henry Waxman and Lacy Clay on June 11 that they...

  • Numbers Crunch. Miller, John J. // National Review;7/20/1998, Vol. 50 Issue 13, p22 

    The article focuses on the plans of the U.S. Bureau of the Census to conduct a census in 2000. It has been proposed that in the 2000 census, the census-takers will not attempt to count directly every person living in the U.S. Instead, they will count 90 percent of the population and attempt to...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics