TITLE

Open and Shut -- Immigration to the U.S

PUB. DATE
October 2006
SOURCE
School Librarian's Workshop;Oct/Nov2006, Vol. 27 Issue 2, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article recommends activity programs for high school students regarding the history of immigration to the United States and immigration laws. School librarians can work with U.S. History or Current Events teachers to help students understand how the country has restricted or welcomed immigrants from around the world. The development of immigration laws can be traced by paired students. The message of the poem "The New Colossus," by Emma Lazarus may be compared with the laws.
ACCESSION #
22573360

 

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