TITLE

Afghanistan: A Soviet View

AUTHOR(S)
Evtuhov, Catherine
PUB. DATE
April 1980
SOURCE
Harvard International Review;Apr/May1980, Vol. 2 Issue 7, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the Soviet Union state newspaper's comments in response to the U.S. role in Afghanistan. The state newspaper accounts that the Afgan-Soviet individuals denounce the American actions while confirming their support for the Soviet government. It has been noted that the Soviet's gesture to the Afghans is an effort to help preserve the independence of Afghanistan from the Western imperialist ambition.
ACCESSION #
21833213

 

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