TITLE

Can lab-grown sperm restore fertility?

AUTHOR(S)
Baines, Emma
PUB. DATE
July 2006
SOURCE
GP: General Practitioner;7/21/2006, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on a media report based on a study which showed that sperm grown in vitro from embryonic stem cells are capable of fertilizing eggs and producing live offspring. During the study, the researchers genetically altered mouse embryonic stem cells. The researchers stated that the findings could lead to new ways of treating male infertility in the future.
ACCESSION #
21823074

 

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