TITLE

Nuclear Weapons Development in China

AUTHOR(S)
Frank, Lewis A.
PUB. DATE
January 1966
SOURCE
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists;Jan1966, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports developments pertaining to the nuclear weapons in China. The two atomic tests of October 16, 1964 and May 14, 1965 had marked the entry of the People's Republic of China into the nuclear club, an entry which was planned and methodically executed by the Peking regime over the years. The evolution of the Chinese atomic bomb can conveniently be divided into two phases. The first phase is in 1950 through 1958 which is characterized by heavy Chinese reliance upon and cooperation with the Soviet Union for financial, material, and technical support. On the other hand, the second phase is in 1959 to 1965 in which the country became almost entirely self-sufficient in all phases of nuclear weapons research, development, engineering, testing and production.
ACCESSION #
21499236

 

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