TITLE

"Sententia" and Structure in Tacitus "Histories" 1.12-49

AUTHOR(S)
Keitel, Elizabeth
PUB. DATE
May 2006
SOURCE
Arethusa;Spring2006, Vol. 39 Issue 2, p219
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses the expression of the theme sententia in the literary work "Histories," by Cornelius Tacitus. The Roman author uses the term to describe the features of the moral and political breakdown of the Roman society. Tacitus portrays the theme in the first chapter of his book when he tackled the decline of history writing after the establishment of the principate. He dwells on commonplaces of the Roman philosophical tradition. In addition, Tacitus prepares his reader to consider its implications beyond the confines of the advisors of the main character. In the narrative, the basic themes which are distilled in generalities are fully set out in every block.
ACCESSION #
21384290

 

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