TITLE

Learning From Monkeys and Chimps

AUTHOR(S)
Carmichael, Mary
PUB. DATE
June 2006
SOURCE
Newsweek;6/26/2006, Vol. 147 Issue 26, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on the differences between how certain viruses, like HIV, behave in monkeys and humans. The ideal virus doesn't make its host sick. The immune systems of certain African monkeys tolerate HIV-related viruses and the monkeys don't get sick. Human immune systems, however, exhaust themselves fighting the virus. Virologists think that a change in HIV treatment strategy from boosting the immune system's response to initially reducing its response may actually help.
ACCESSION #
21206931

 

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