TITLE

Surgically treating cruciate ligament rupture in cats

AUTHOR(S)
Harari, Joseph
PUB. DATE
May 2006
SOURCE
Veterinary Medicine;May2006, Vol. 101 Issue 5, p268
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses research on the surgical treatment of feline cranial cruciate ligament injury from a veterinary clinic in Regina, Saskatchewan between 1997 and 2004. Reference to a study by G. L. G. Harasen, published in a 2005 issue of the "Veterinary Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology"; Background on the study population; Implication of the study findings.
ACCESSION #
21149105

 

Related Articles

  • Incidence of infection and premature crimp failure after repair of cranial cruciate ligament-deficient stifles in 110 dogs. McCartney, W. T.; O'Connor, J. V.; McCann, W. M. // Veterinary Record: Journal of the British Veterinary Association;8/18/2007, Vol. 161 Issue 7, p232 

    The article presents a study which investigates the incidence of infection and premature crimp failure after repair of cranial cruciate ligament-deficient stifles in 110 dogs. Researchers have observed 110 cases of stifle stabilization which uses the crimp clamp method. Results reveal that...

  • The lame cat: common culprits of non-traumatic lameness when pain localises to the stifle. Perry, Karen L. // Companion Animal (2053-0889);2015, Vol. 20 Issue 1, p26 

    The most common non-traumatic conditions that have been described affecting the feline stifle joint are cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) rupture and patellar luxation. In many cases, physical examination findings alone can be strongly suggestive of these diagnoses but some cases may present a...

  • AVALIAÇÃO DE CADÁVERES QUIMICAMENTE PRESERVADOS. da Silva, Joelma Jesus; Moreira da Costa Neto, João; de Jesus Moraes, Vinicius; Teixeira, Diana Mello; Martins Filho, Emanoel Ferreira; Conceição Junior, Deusdete Gomes // Archives of Veterinary Science;SUP2012, Vol. 17 Issue S1, p69 

    Chemically preserved corpses can be used to assure the dexterity of the surgeon, for both, their characteristics should present itself like a living animal. Various formulations can be used for this purpose, however, the existing studies are limited experimentation, not seeking the opinion of...

  • SHORT TAKES, Heart Disease in Cats.  // Cat Watch;May2012, p2 

    The article reports on the study published in the "Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery" which examined the association between feline murmurs and heart diseases in cats in the U.S.

  • The High Cost of Cranial Cruciate Ligament Injury. Durand, Marcella // Dog World;Apr2006, Vol. 91 Issue 4, p8 

    Warns dog owners of the high cost of cranial cruciate ligament injury (RCCL). Study conducted by researchers at Iowa State University; Prevalence of RCCL; Implications of the study findings.

  • Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy and Cranial Closing Wedge Ostectomy in a Cat With Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture. Hoots, Eric A.; Petersen, Steve W. // Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association;Nov2005, Vol. 41 Issue 6, pN.PAG 

    The article presents an abstract of the study "Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy and Cranial Closing Wedge Ostectomy in a Cat With Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture," by Eric A. Hoots and Steve W. Petersen.

  • Thoracoscopy: A viable treatment of lung tumors in dogs. Harari, Joseph // Veterinary Medicine;May2006, Vol. 101 Issue 5, p266 

    Discusses research on whether thoracoscopy is a viable treatment of lung tumors in dogs. Reference to a study by J. L. Lansdowne et al, published in a 2005 issue of "Veterinary Surgery"; Information on the study population; Indication of the results of the study.

  • Comparison of flank and midline approaches to the ovariohysterectomy of cats. Coe, R. J.; Grint, N. J.; Livers, M. S.; Moore, A. Hotston; Hoil, P. E. // Veterinary Record: Journal of the British Veterinary Association;9/2/2006, Vol. 159 Issue 10, p309 

    In a survey of UK veterinary practitioners, 96 per cent indicated that they performed ovariohysterectomy on cats via flank laparatomy rather than a midline coeliotomy. At a veterinary teaching hospital 32 cats were spayed by the midline approach and 34 by the flank approach, by undergraduate...

  • Why Spaying Beef Heifers Makes Sense. Thomas, Heather Smith // Beef Expert Blog;10/ 4/2013, p1 

    The article discusses the process of spaying heifers, or a young cow that has not given birth, which is the removal of the ovaries through surgery to prevent estrous cycle and pregnancies. Research showed a 5.5% gain advantage for spayed heifers against intact heifers and a reduction in...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics