TITLE

ID and SETI

AUTHOR(S)
Camp, Robert
PUB. DATE
March 2006
SOURCE
Skeptic;2006, Vol. 12 Issue 2, p54
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on issues whether intelligent design (ID) can be considered scientific in the same way as the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). It is believed by researcher William Dembski that ID will stand up to a methodology-level comparison with SETI. However, the comparison is only useful regarding ID if one understands certain assumptions inherent in SETI.
ACCESSION #
20318572

 

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