TITLE

I Would Not Murder for the Soviets

AUTHOR(S)
Khokhlov, Nikolai E.
PUB. DATE
November 1954
SOURCE
Saturday Evening Post;11/20/1954, Vol. 227 Issue 21, p27
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article relates the author's story during his tenure as a secret service agent in Russia. In 1941 when he entered a group bearing Nikolai Volin as his nom de guerre, he became an entertainer and artistic whistler with the aim of sabotaging the German forces in Moscow. During his encounter with Herr Okolovich, he decided to end his career as Soviet secret intelligence, and said that he would not murder him. The author already resides in the U.S., while his wife and son are in Moscow.
ACCESSION #
19453553

 

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