TITLE

BLOOD IS SPILT AT BOTH OF OUR HOUSES, 1793

PUB. DATE
October 2002
SOURCE
Cherokee Voices;2002, p86
SOURCE TYPE
Primary Source Document
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This chapter reports on the attack led by captain John Beard on several Cherokee leaders during a meeting with white settlers in the Southwest Territory of the U.S. in 1793. Cherokee Indians were duped into ceding their lands for a yearly annuity of one thousand dollars and a few supplies during the Treaty of Holston in 1791. Governor William Blount had called the meeting to restore peace following the attacks made by Chickamauga Cherokees on white settlements at the instigation of the Spanish. Cherokees under their leader Hanging Maw and Chickamauga chief John Watts met with Blount in November 1794 and reached a peace agreement.
ACCESSION #
19272356

 

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