TITLE

There Is No Money in the United States Treasury

PUB. DATE
February 1938
SOURCE
Saturday Evening Post;2/26/1938, Vol. 210 Issue 35, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Criticizes the practice of government in overspending taxes collected in the U.S. Argument on protests against excessive taxation; Impact of taxation on industry; Correlation between taxation, investment and employment.
ACCESSION #
18747598

 

Related Articles

  • Tax Systems Modernization: Results of Review of IRS' Initial Expenditure Plan: AIMD/GGD-99-206.  // GAO Reports;6/15/1999, p1 

    Presents the research paper entitled "Tax Systems Modernization: Results of Review of IRS' Initial Expenditure Plan" by the U.S. General Accounting Office to be submitted to Congressional Requesters.

  • THE GENERAL REVENUE EFFECTS OF THE CALIFORNIA PROPERTY TAX LIMITATION AMENDMENT: A COMMENT. Vasch�, Jon David // National Tax Journal;Dec78, Vol. 31 Issue 4, p399 

    This article presents an analysis of the general revenue effects of Proposition 13 in California by Perry Shapiro and Douglas Morgan appeared in the June 1978 issue of the �National Tax Journal.� The study indicates that examination of tax policy must account for the mutual...

  • Nevada Residents Leaning Towards Tax-Raising Measures. Jasmina Kelemen // Bond Buyer;10/25/2004, Vol. 350 Issue 31996, p5 

    Reports on the inclination of Nevada residents to support an initiative that would raise taxes and increase public spending. Lack of awareness of voters on the potential tax implications of the initiative; Likelihood of Nevadans to support measures that would make educational funding a priority;...

  • STATE LIMITATIONS ON LOCAL TAXING AND SPENDING POWERS: A RESPONSE. Ladd, Helen F. // National Tax Journal;Dec78, Vol. 31 Issue 4, p397 

    This article offers a response to the commentary of Michael Bell and Ronald Fisher on the measurement of the potential efficiency loss associated with state limitations on local taxing and spending powers. Bell and Fisher indicate, the logic of the median voter model does not rule out the...

  • THE WELFARE COST OF TAXATION: A FURTHER VIEW. Browning, Edgar K. // National Tax Journal;Dec78, Vol. 31 Issue 4, p415 

    This article addresses a recent paper published in the �National Tax Journal,� in which the author pointed out that the conventional method of estimating the welfare cost of taxes ignores one potentially important type of welfare cost. The use of distorting taxes makes it inefficient...

  • INFORMATION ON EXPENDITURE FOR PARLIAMENT: AN OVERVIEW AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS. Likierman, Andrew // Parliamentary Affairs;Jul88, Vol. 41 Issue 3, p362 

    The article presents an overview of the documents used by the British Parliament to fulfill their public expenditure duties. The Autumn Statement provides a summary of economic prospects for the given year and an outline of public expenditure for each department which include separate sections...

  • When Is the Debt a Burden? Jordan, Jerry L. // Fraser Forum;Aug2004, p21 

    The amount spent annually by the government reflects a real burden, but whether to finance such spending by borrowing versus taxing is not the critical issue. Since the amount any government spends represents whatever burden is created, one sure way to lessen the burden would be to spend less....

  • Slippery surplus. Stammer, Don // BRW;3/25/2004, Vol. 26 Issue 11, p24 

    Discusses the challenges facing the Australian Treasurer in preparing the federal government's budget for 2004-05. Problem with spending the projected budget surplus; Low level of saving in Australia; Shortcomings in important items of government spending; Flaws in tax system; Addiction to...

  • Public spending and optimal taxes without commitment. Benhabib, Jess; Rustichini, Aldo; Velasco, Andrés // Review of Economic Design;2001, Vol. 6 Issue 3/4, p371 

    We consider a representative agent, infinite-horizon economy where production requires private and public capital. The supply of public capital is financed through distortionary taxation. The optimal (second best) tax policy of a benevolent government is time inconsistent. We therefore introduce...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics