TITLE

The Peculiar Legacy of German-Americans

AUTHOR(S)
Carlson, Allan C.
PUB. DATE
January 2003
SOURCE
Society;Jan/Feb2003, Vol. 40 Issue 2, p77
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the peculiar legacy of German-Americans. The founding of the new American Republic created an asylum of liberty, a new order for the ages, where the ideals of freedom, equality, and republicanism held sway and where ethnic considerations counted for little. The naturalization policy adopted in 1790 reflected widespread confidence in the power of American principles and institutions to transform immigrants quickly into acceptable Americans, without systematic coercion. Americans of German descent continue to show some peculiar traits. From the 1920s to as late as 1970, they were still more likely to be married than the general population; more likely to have three or more children; more likely to reside in male-headed households; more likely to have some higher education; less likely to be unemployed; more likely to count farmers in their ranks; and more likely to pass the family farm across the generations.
ACCESSION #
18673629

 

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