TITLE

Learn About Your New Students

AUTHOR(S)
Byrnes, MaryAnn
PUB. DATE
September 2005
SOURCE
Intervention in School & Clinic;Sep2005, Vol. 41 Issue 1, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article suggests that knowing as much as possible about the new students helps the school year begin smoothly for teachers, students, and parents. According to the author, it is easy to misinterpret a new student's behavior during the first few days. To avoid such misinterpretations, a teacher should conduct a short-term behavior management program. Some students need support throughout the day. Other students experience times of particular stress. Therefore, teachers need to inquire whether the new students require assistance most during independent learning times. Further, it is easy to focus on needs but it is equally important to know areas where a student can work without his teacher. Acknowledging competence and independence communicates confidence in his student. In addition, it is suggested that establishing communications quickly forges a strong school/home partnership. Although it is usually easy to tell when a student is totally frustrated, it is important to ask about behavioral cues that appear before a crisis arrives.
ACCESSION #
17997130

 

Related Articles

  • THE EFFECTS OF INSTRUCTOR SERVICE PERFORMANCE, IMMEDIACY, AND TRUST ON STUDENT-FACULTY OUT-OF-CLASS COMMUNICATION. Faranda, William T. // Marketing Education Review;2015, Vol. 25 Issue 2, p83 

    Student initiated out-of-class communication (OCC) with instructors has been linked to benefits for students, faculty, and the institution at large, yet garners little attention in business education research. Much of the literature found in communication and higher education research has...

  • WHAT DO YOU WHEN A STUDENT ASKS YOU A CONTROVERSIAL QUESTION?  // Middle East Educator;2009, Issue 13, p51 

    The article offers insights from several teachers concerning the situation in which a student asks controversial question to his teacher. One states that she would not give her personal opinion but would show the students the different points of views that the question holds and leave it to them...

  • Real Challenges, Virtual Solutions. MCCABE, CYNTHIA KOPKOWSKI // NEA Today;Mar/Apr2009, Vol. 27 Issue 5, p32 

    The article discusses the use of videoconferencing to teach students in remote areas of Alaska. The author notes that harsh conditions in rural Alaska have led to high teacher turnover. Village classrooms are equipped with screens and a microphone, allowing students to communicate with a teacher...

  • Children's "Social Betterment.".  // America;11/21/1914, Vol. 12 Issue 6, p147 

    The author advocates the social betterment of children by letting schoolteachers know about their pupils' home lives. A canvass made by some Philadelphia, Pennyslvania teachers showed that pupils who drink beer are those with the poorest conduct in school. The superintendent of schools...

  • No Ceiling on Praise. Wilson, Melvin C. // Educational Leadership;Jan1947, Vol. 4 Issue 4, p227 

    Giving credit for good work is such a simple thing to do, according to Melvin C. Wilson, principal, Rigler Elementary School, Portland, Ore., who indicates that a word of praise now and then to adults as well as to children will hardly fall on deaf ears. Mr. Wilson pleads for the kind of...

  • Facilitating conceptual change through modeling in the middle school science classroom. Carrejo, David J.; Reinhartz, Judy // Middle School Journal;Nov2014, Vol. 46 Issue 2, p10 

    This article examines a professional development program that helped teachers use models as a means to foster conceptual change in eighth grade science students and deepen their understanding about motion.

  • Teach Mathematics: Strategies to Reach All Students. Furner, Joseph M.; Yahya, Noorchaya; Duffy, Mary Lou // Intervention in School & Clinic;Sep2005, Vol. 41 Issue 1, p16 

    These suggestions are by no means exhaustive. With this grab bag of strategies, teachers can creatively design their lesson activities to meet students' individual needs. We have offered strategies and techniques that will match the learning styles of all students–reaching all students...

  • Ensure Success As a Novice Teacher. Goodwin, Marilyn W.; Judd, Laura // Intervention in School & Clinic;Sep2005, Vol. 41 Issue 1, p24 

    This article offers tips to help ease some of the challenging aspects of the beginning of a teaching career. It is suggested that laughter is the best antidote to behavior problems and boredom in the classroom. Humor is universal and diverse and an asset for teachers within the learning...

  • Looping: Discovering the Difference. Jordan, Doris // Teaching Pre K-8;Mar2000, Vol. 30 Issue 6, p58 

    Focuses on the benefits of looping to teachers and students during the first day of school. Activities given by teachers to their students; Information on the most significant discovery of the teachers about their students; Description of the class' attitude after they had a loop.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics