TITLE

Constitutional Convention

AUTHOR(S)
McGill, Sara Ann
PUB. DATE
August 2017
SOURCE
Constitutional Convention;8/1/2017, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents an overview of the 1787 Constitutional Convention, held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Efforts of the delegates to amend the Articles of Confederation; Details of James Madison's Virginia Plan, which provided for three branches of federal government; Compromise among Federalist and Anti-Federalist delegates; Impact of the 'Federalist Papers' on the states' decision to ratify the new Constitution; How the Whiskey Rebellion tested the strength of the new federal government; Creation of the Bill of Rights.
ACCESSION #
17907587

 

Related Articles

  • The Bill of Rights That Nobody Wanted. Ernsberger Jr., Richard // American History;Jun2015, Vol. 50 Issue 2, p30 

    An interview with Baruch College emerita professor of history Carol Berkin is presented in which she discusses the proposal for a bill of rights protecting civil liberties during the 1787 Constitutional Convention. She discusses the proposal made by Antifederalist George Mason, the...

  • History Mysteries. Simon, Richard G. // American Heritage;Apr91, Vol. 42 Issue 2, p8 

    Presents a letter to the editor of the April 1, 1991 issue of 'American Heritage,' about the article 'Mysteries of American History.' Comments on James Madison's turnaround in pushing the Bill of rights through Congress after resisting it at the Constitutional Convention.

  • Lessons from a Lost Constitution: The Council of Revision, the Bill of Rights, and the Role of the Judiciary in Democratic Governance. Jones, Robert L. // Journal of Law & Politics;Spring2012, Vol. 27 Issue 3, p459 

    This Article explores the relationship between the Council of Revision and the Bill of Rights. The Council of Revision, proposed at the Constitutional Convention by James Madison and the other Virginia delegates as part of the "Virginia Plan," would have been comprised of the President and...

  • Born of Struggle and Compromise. Blackmun, Harry // Humanist;Nov/Dec91, Vol. 51 Issue 6, p5 

    Reflects on the fact that the Bill of Rights was actually opposed by many of the Constitution's framers. Federalist opposition; Conversion to their cause of the popular James Madison by the Antifederalists; Eventual framing of a statement of individual rights through pragmatism and compromise...

  • TIME TRIP.  // Current Events;9/6/2002, Vol. 102 Issue 1, p2 

    Presents the history of the U.S. constitution. Role of president James Madison in the formulation of the constitution; Adoption of the constitution; Amendments to the Bill of Rights.

  • Give the People WHAT THEY WANT. Calkins, Virginia // Cobblestone;Dec2007, Vol. 28 Issue 9, p26 

    The article relates how James Madison, a representative for Virginia in the first U.S. Congress, persuaded the U.S. Congress to approve the Bill of Rights.

  • Legacy: A CONVERSATION WITH JAMES MADISON. Smolla, Rodney A. // ABA Journal;Aug91, Vol. 77 Issue 8, p50 

    Presents a hypothetical conversation with James Madison who wrote the First Amendment in the United States constitution. Basic guiding principles on the First Amendment; Reasons for keeping secret his personal notes from the Constitutional Convention; Constitutional right of a citizen to burn...

  • Mr. Madison keeps his promise. Calkins, V. // Cobblestone;Sep91, Vol. 12 Issue 9, p24 

    Recounts the events leading up to the ratification of the Bill of Rights, written by Virginia Representative James Madison, in 1791. Madison's original eight amendments to the Constitution; Explanations of amendments; Reworking of amendments by House and Senate; Ratification by states. INSET:...

  • CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. Williams, Jean Kinney // U.S. Constitution;2003, p39 

    The article focuses on the U.S. Constitutional amendments. When the new Congress met for the first time in 1790, James Madison, author of much of the Constitution, introduced a list of rights to be added to it. Changes, or amendments, to the Constitution must be approved by the states, so...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics