TITLE

The Legacy of the Tank: The Violence of Peace

AUTHOR(S)
Henry, Doug
PUB. DATE
April 2005
SOURCE
Anthropological Quarterly;Spring2005, Vol. 78 Issue 2, p443
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article examines the health effects of post-conflict reconstruction and the social price of having so many peacekeepers present in Sierra Leone. The violence of war continued to shape how everyday life could be carried on. Women were again finding themselves disadvantaged relative to men in terms of the opportunities available during post-war reconstruction, in that relief programs were again failing to address the needs and capabilities of girls. In 2002, the United National Health Commissioner of Refugees and the British relief agency Save the Children caused a media uproar when they reported that male food distributors working for international relief agencies were demanding sex from young girls in exchange for food entitlements. Clearly, even during these times of relief, even at the hands of some relief workers, the violence had not ended for these women. Scarce supplies, vulnerability to exploration, lack of economic opportunities and lack of awareness or ability to access rights and recourse to protection could combine to necessitate that sex work remain a continued means of survival. In Sierra Leone, sexual networking and commercial sex work, particularly in the absence of condom use, is particularly dangerous from a public health standpoint, in regards to the spread of infection to the local population.
ACCESSION #
17498492

 

Related Articles

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics