TITLE

The Darwinian Revolution as Viewed by a Philosophical Biologist

AUTHOR(S)
Ghiselin, Michael T.
PUB. DATE
March 2005
SOURCE
Journal of the History of Biology;Spring2005, Vol. 38 Issue 1, p123
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Points out that the Darwinian revolution is still in progress, and changes that are going on are reflected in the contemporary historical and philosophical literature, including that written by scientists. Development of a new ontology as a consequence of the realization that species are individuals; Provision of a clear distinction between the roles of history and of laws of nature.
ACCESSION #
17079883

 

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