TITLE

Causal Influences on Productivity Performance 1820-1992: A Global Perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Maddison, Angus
PUB. DATE
November 1997
SOURCE
Journal of Productivity Analysis;Nov1997, Vol. 8 Issue 4, p325
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This paper has three main purposes: a) it uses a comparative quantitative framework to demonstrate the pace of economic growth in different parts of the world economy since 1820, and to identify the major causes which have been operative; b) it analyses the different approaches which economists have developed to interpret proximate growth causality; and (c) it reviews the role of institutions and other deeper and less measurable influences on growth performance.
ACCESSION #
16851758

 

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