TITLE

The Moral Insignificance of ``Bare'' Personal Reasons

AUTHOR(S)
McPherson, Lionel K.
PUB. DATE
July 2002
SOURCE
Philosophical Studies;Jul2002, Vol. 110 Issue 1, p29
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Common sense supports the idea that we can have morally significant reasons for giving priority to the interests of persons for whom we have special concern. Yet there is a real question about the nature of such reasons. Many people seem to believe that there are biological or metaphysical special relations, such as family, race, religion or personal identity, which are in themselves morally important and thus supply reasons for special concern. I maintain that there are no grounds for accepting this. What matters morally, I argue, is the substance of personal or wider social relationships. My ``substantivist'' account of the source of morally salient reasons for special concern is positioned between nonreductionist and strong voluntarist views of special responsibilities. Substantivism is more plausible than these views and has important implications for how we approach morally weighing personal versus impartial reasons.
ACCESSION #
16630693

 

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