TITLE

POPULATION MOVEMENTS IN CHICAGO

AUTHOR(S)
Allison, Thomas W.
PUB. DATE
May 1924
SOURCE
Journal of Social Forces;May1924, Vol. 2 Issue 4, p529
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses population movements in Chicago, Illinois. Cities grow like trees, dying at the heart and building anew around the periphery. In 1860 Chicago boasted population of 109,206 persons. The whole population was confined to about 30 square miles. Thirty years later the same area contained over 700,000, but the process of migration had already begun in the central business district. By 1920 more than 110,000 people had abandoned the old port city for the better housing a few miles further out. Where their old habitations have not been razed to the ground and the lots used for parking or junk the space has been occupied by buildings devoted to industry or commerce. This outward migration began to speed up about 1900 when probably the greatest density in the old residence areas of the city was reached, a density which mounted in some instances to 75,000 persons to the square mile. Here at the heart of the city, even within the memory of living men and women, were found the commodious homes of the early captains of industry with their spacious lawns and spreading trees. Today the dilapidated survivals house an army of men and women, generally without children. These former homes of the elite have become the cheaper light housekeeping quarters of the city, housing more than 60,000 men and perhaps 12,000 women.
ACCESSION #
16605300

 

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics