TITLE

U.S. Opposition to International Criminal Court May Preclude a Hearing on Darfur

AUTHOR(S)
Williams, Ian
PUB. DATE
April 2005
SOURCE
Washington Report on Middle East Affairs;Apr2005, Vol. 24 Issue 3, p28
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article author is of the view that U.S. opposition to International Criminal Court (ICC) may preclude a hearing on atrocities in Darfur, Sudan. On March 2, Human Rights Watch released a videotape in which Musa Hilal, a top leader of the Janjaweed militia in Darfur, told the interviewers that the government of Sudan directed all military activities of the militia forces. Ironically, when the Rome Treaty establishing the court was set up, allies of the U.S. and friends of the ICC inside the U.S. legal profession argued sincerely that U.S. courts and laws would ensure that no Americans need ever appear before it. Ironically, U.S. President George W. Bush administration has been trying to win brownie points at home by maintaining that what is taking place in Darfur is "genocide," even though the U.N. Commission of Inquiry ruled differently.
ACCESSION #
16499674

 

Related Articles

  • The Doctrine of Abuse of Process: A Comment on the Cambodia Tribunal's Decisions in the Case against Duch (2007). RYNGAERT, CEDRIC // Leiden Journal of International Law;2008, Vol. 21 Issue 3, p719 

    The Cambodia Tribunal's co-investigating judges' first order, for the provisional detention of Duch, one of the suspects for the atrocities committed by the regime of Democratic Kampuchea in the 1970s, addresses the application of the doctrines of male captus bene detentus and abuse of process....

  • PROSECUTORIAL DISCRETION BEFORE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURTS AND PERCEPTIONS OF JUSTICE: HOW EXPANDED PROSECUTORIAL INDEPENDENCE CAN INCREASE THE ACCOUNTABILITY OF INTERNATIONAL ACTORS. Horton, Lenore F. // Eyes on the ICC;2010/2011, Vol. 7, p5 

    This article traces the history of the international criminal prosecutor and determines that prosecutorial discretion before the ICC, vis-à-vis ad hoc criminal tribunals, is more clearly articulated by governing instruments, more transparently and proactively interpreted by the Office of the...

  • The Odd One Out. Dobrovolny, Michelle // New Presence: The Prague Journal of Central European Affairs;Summer2008, Vol. 10 Issue 2, p12 

    The article offers information on the impact of the rejection made by the Chamber of Deputies on the ratification of the Rome Statue to Czech Republic. The ratification is important to the country because it would bring the nation into the jurisdictional fold of the International Criminal Court....

  • Learning about atrocities from children. Moszynski, Peter // BMJ: British Medical Journal (Overseas & Retired Doctors Edition;12/5/2009, Vol. 339 Issue 7733, p1278 

    The article reports on the creation of Article 1, a charity group based in London, England that aims to inform government and citizens about the prevention of genocide and mass atrocities, on November 25, 2009. Cofounder Rebecca Tinsley believes that the children's drawings from Darfur are...

  • THE BEST ROUTE. Podgers, James // ABA Journal;Dec2006, Vol. 92 Issue 12, p62 

    The article offers information on a conference conducted by the American Bar Association in October 2006 about the impact of the International Criminal Court of the United Nation and other transitional justice approaches in resolving human rights abuses, atrocities and genocide. Approaches to...

  • War Crimes and Atrocities Committed by the Western Superpowers. MARVASTI, JAMSHID A. // Journal of Psychohistory;Fall2014, Vol. 42 Issue 2, p130 

    The article discusses war crimes and atrocities attributed to powerful Western nations. Particular focus is given to the psychological aspects of these crimes. Topics include the International Tribunal Court (ITC), the International Criminal Court (ICC), and the U.S. bombings of the Japanese...

  • Saving the war crimes tribunal. Thornberry, Cedric // Foreign Policy;Fall96, Issue 104, p72 

    Discusses the need for an impartial international criminal court based on the atrocities committed in former Yugoslavia. Comparison between Hague court and past tribunals; Charges filed against leaders of former Yugoslavia; Role of the U.N. Protection Force in curbing `ethnic cleansing' brutality.

  • Within Four Swift Years, ICTR Shows Results.  // UN Chronicle;1998, Vol. 35 Issue 3, p5 

    Reports that the decisions of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) has brought to practical life the lofty ideals of the Genocide Convention. Prosecution of genocide by the Court as a historic milestone; Information about the ICTR.

  • FOREWORD: THE ROLE OF JUSTICE IN BUILDING PEACE. Scharf, Michael P. // Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law;Spring2003, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p153 

    Introduces a series of articles which appeared in the Spring 2003 issue of the "Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law". Arguments against the practice of emphasizing the distinction between genocide and crime against humanity of other types; Personal recollections of Henry King about...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics