TITLE

Lula's Neo-Liberal Regime: A Reply to Gacek

AUTHOR(S)
Petras, James
PUB. DATE
September 2004
SOURCE
Social Policy;Fall2004, Vol. 35 Issue 1, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article responds to comments made by Stanley Gacek on an essay by the present author published in the Volume 34, Number 4 issue of Social Policy which critically analyzes the first two years of the administration of Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva. The present author begins by saying that there are serious political issues that go beyond Gacek's apologia of the Lula regime in Brazil. One is the notion that the business of government is to guarantee the interests of the financial markets before any social or economic policy or reform can be considered. Another is that only sacrifice by low paid workers, landless farmworkers, civil service pensioners can permit government to put its budget in order and sustain economic growth. A third is the notion that state intervention is a classless term which can be discussed independently of the class interests of those who wield state power and those classes which reap the benefits of state intervention. In this article, the present author centers his discussion on the issues of agrarian reform, public policymaking, state intervention; structural changes versus state clientelism; and foreign policy (independent or dependent).
ACCESSION #
16196442

 

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