TITLE

Energy crops are set to become the new fuel

AUTHOR(S)
Short, Wendy; Abel, Charles
PUB. DATE
October 2004
SOURCE
Farmers Weekly;10/29/2004, Vol. 141 Issue 18, p59
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the plan of the British government to convert energy crops into fuel by 2009. Amount of fuel needed from energy crops; Cost of the plan.
ACCESSION #
15151744

 

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