TITLE

PURSUING THE POACHERS

AUTHOR(S)
Boyce, Nell
PUB. DATE
October 2004
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;10/18/2004, Vol. 137 Issue 13, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Highlights efforts to curtail the poaching of elephants in Africa for the illegal trade of ivory. Forensic technique which allows investigators to trace the origin of ivory via genetic markers; Intention of authorities to increase anti-poaching efforts in areas where illegal ivory originates; Goal of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species to adopt stricter regulations on domestic ivory sales; Investigation into the exact African origin of an illegal shipment of ivory confiscated in Singapore in 2002.
ACCESSION #
14684789

 

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