TITLE

Hope for Geneva

PUB. DATE
May 1959
SOURCE
New Republic;5/4/59, Vol. 140 Issue 18, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the counter-proposal from the Soviet Union to U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower's suggestion to limit the ban agreement to atmospheric explosions in order to prevent the failure of the Geneva negotiations for suspending nuclear bomb tests. Possibility of Soviet Premier Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev's willingness to accept a limited inspection system for test ban monitoring; Belief of Khrushchev that Eisenhower's proposal will not prevent pollution of the atmosphere; Information on a letter of Eisenhower in which he prefers to stop all tests; Suggestion regarding what the West should do about the Soviet's proposal.
ACCESSION #
14563124

 

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